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New Winter Flights To Telluride

“Winter is Coming” – Telluride Ski Resort unveils its new Winter Anthem 2017-2018

Telluride Ski Resort just unveiled its “Winter Anthem” for the 2017-2018 ski season. Click above to play a beautiful and inspiring video of the many great things Telluride has to offer in the winter season…come join us this winter for another season that promises magic and wonder! For more information and to visit Telluride Ski Resort click here

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This Weekend in Telluride!

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W | A Travel Guide to Telluride, Where There’s More Snow Than in New York Right Now

February 9, 2017 1:00 pm

As you make the drive from the airport in Montrose, Colorado into Telluride, you pass the remains of old mining operations and wind through the striking San Miguel Mountains. The anticipation continues to build until finally, you drive into the box canyon where Telluride (which was originally named Columbia when it was founded back in 1878) sits.

Part of the allure of Telluride, which transitioned from a mining town to a ski-bunny, hippie haven in the late ’60s and ’70s, has long been its exclusivity. It’s hard to get to, making it extremely attractive for celebrities like Oprah Winfrey and designer Ralph Lauren to buy land in this Colorado ski enclave. Celebrities won’t be bothered by paparazzi or swarming fans here—it’s almost an unspoken rule that you just go about business as usual, similar to other hotbeds for the rich and famous, even if Tom Cruise or Katie Holmes are walking down the street with Suri tagging along.

Telluride Ski Resort. Photo: @tellurideski

As opposed to other more glitzy ski towns around the world, Telluride is not a place to see-and-be-seen, and you can leave your outrageous fur coats and Moon Boots at home—there’s no place for them here.

As Lauren explained in an interview, “Colorado was an escape for us. It wasn’t about being in fashion. It was about a life that would be different, that would be freer—that would have nature and trees and animals and big sky.”

Just because Telluride is about understated glamour, however, doesn’t mean it lacks a strong culinary scene, high-end shops, or luxury accommodations. This small town needs to cater to the most discerning of tastes and it does not disappoint on that front. You’ll find impressive local microbrews, wine lists with some of the world’s best bottles, multi-course tasting menus served at the top of the mountain. To help, here are some insider tips to use as your plan your itinerary:

When to Go:
Telluride Ski Resort is a skier’s paradise in the winter months, with everything from a beginner’s terrain to hike-to-ski areas to Nordic-style skiing. In the spring and summer, however, Telluride plays host to some of the country’s top film and music festivals, like the Telluride Film Festival and the Telluride Bluegrass Festival. (Summer, for the record, increasingly draws the biggest crowds of all.)

Madeline Hotel & Residences
Madeline Hotel & Residences

Photo: Madeline Hotel & Residences

Where to Stay: Madeline Hotel and Residences, situated right on the slopes with ski-in/ski-out access, is a go-to spot for repeat Telluride visitors from around the world. Highlights include the sweeping mountain views from the rooms, the food at Black Iron kitchen (make sure to try the Colorado lamb sliders), an impressive fitness center with the most up-to-date equipment (in case you need to work off a few too many lamb sliders or French fries), and the full service spa with an inspired range of treatments, ranging from targeted ski and mountain recovery treatments to crystal massage therapy. If you want something remote and extra luxe, opt for Telluride Ski Resort’s Tempter House, situated at 12,200 feet up on the mountain. The house was designed in the late ’90s by Anne Eckley, who is registered nationally at New York’s Metropolitan Museum of Art.

Where to Eat:
For fast and casual bites, the innovative tacos at Tacos del Gnar in town will blow your mind. If you are in need of something to warm you up in between ski runs, Poachers Pub is where the locals go—try the chili and the Ska Euphoria IPA. Other on-mountain dining favorites include Bon Vivant (for French country cuisine like crepes and cheese plates) and High Camp (they have self serve hot chocolate!). For a more gourmet, special dining experience, both Allred’s and Alpino Vino on top of the mountain are a must. Afterwards, if you are still looking to keep the party going, have a nightcap in town at High Pie or There Bar.

Telluride Ski Resort. Photo: @tellurideski

What to Do:
Aside from lots of ski and snowboarding, (and eating), do a scenic fat bike (it’s a bike with extra fat tires so you can bike on the snow) tour to Telluride Brewing Company to sample some local microbrews. Make sure to try the Tempter IPA. Also, spend at least one afternoon exploring the charming town of Telluride (just a short ride away from the mountain village), where you’ll find historic landmarks like the 103-year-old Sheridan Opera House (which has hosted more world premiere films than any theatre in the U.S. between New York and L.A. and still acts as a working theatre today), and a slew of specialty boutiques (Two Skirts is a must, along with Swanky Buckle, Picaya and T.K. Imports for home goods) and galleries. There’s also a cannabis walking tour, led by Telluride Green Tours, where you can visit the town’s many dispensaries and explore the cannabis scene, if that’s up your alley.

VIDEO | Latest Video from Telluride Ski Resort

Telluride is one of the most visually striking destinations in the world. Whether the lush, green summer, the striking gold fall, or the snow dusted frosty winter, the peaks and natural landscape are unforgettable. But don’t let us sway you, discover Telluride winter for yourself from a truly unique aerial perspective.

To visit Telluride Luxury Properties click here

Architectural Digest | 5 Valuable Lessons Aspen Can Learn from Telluride

As far as North American ski towns go, Aspen, Colorado, is tough to beat. It has not one but four mountains and a historic yet glitzed-out downtown full of shopping, restaurants, luxury hotels, world-class art, music, and intellectual gatherings. Two hundred miles to the southwest lies a not unknown but more discreet, more remote, more hemmed-in ski hamlet perched some 900 feet higher in the sky. Telluride and Aspen are both mining towns turned ski resorts, but thanks to Telluride’s spectacular setting, wholesome attitude, and homegrown entrepreneurs, it may have a few things to teach its bigger, more famous Coloradan sister.

1. Make your location more inaccessible and dramatic.

A Google Image search of the term box canyon will quickly turn up a photo of Telluride. The town’s population of 2,300 is less than half the size of Aspen’s and is squeezed into an even smaller canyon accessed by a smaller airport (TEX). Most visitors choose to fly into Montrose, some 70 miles to the north. This bite-size valley makes the town feel somehow quainter and more jaw-dropping at the same time.

2. Scale down the architecture.

Downtown Telluride is six blocks wide by 12 blocks long, dotted with adorable pastel Victorian-style houses. The main street is dominated by the courthouse, built in 1886, the New Sheridan Hotel, and the Sheridan Opera House—designed by the same architect as Aspen’s Wheeler Opera House, but at a fraction of the size. The retail boutiques represented in Telluride’s downtown are more Patagonia than Gucci.

3. Less caviar, more tacos.

Aspen has a slew of excellent, cosmopolitan dining options, from Matsuhisa to Chef’s Club at the St. Regis. But sometimes after a day of playing hard in the snow, all one craves is a bowl of piping hot, salty/carby ramen, like the dish served at There Bar, a cozy après-ski spot in one of Telluride’s charming Victorian cottages. Or a good taco like the ones at newly opened Taco del Gnar. At $4.50 a pop, try as many as you like; we recommend the lamb and the Korean short rib. Also try: Caravan (a Middle Eastern food truck), High Pie (pizza and “Telluride Mules”), Siam (for Thai staples), or Esperanza’s (a local favorite). Even the truffle French fries at Tomboy Tavern are toned down compared to Aspen’s Ajax Tavern’s over-the-top bouquet of Parmesan and truffle oil.

4. Gondola rides for everyone!

Both ski towns have gondolas that drop skiers off right in town, but Telluride’s is free. Celebrating its 20th birthday this season, the gondola at Telluride takes passengers up and over the hill to the European-style Mountain Village, built in the 1980s with ski-in, ski-out hotels (for example, the Madeline Hotel). The free gondola makes all of Telluride accessible by foot or ski whether you are staying in Mountain Village or in town, and runs until midnight. The silent swoosh of the cabin as it sweeps down the mountain by moonlight, cozily whisking you to your dinner reservation in the twinkling town below, is enchanting.

5. Design your own skis.

There is no denying the equipment involved in the sport of skiing is a hassle. Many recreational athletes swear by having custom-fit boots made to not waste precious vacation time dealing with rental gear. One Telluride entrepreneur has taken this hack one step further and built a bespoke ski factory in Mountain Village. The process for a pair of Wagner skis starts at home with a questionnaire about your physicality and where you like to ski, then moves to a Skype consultation. Once the blueprint is agreed upon, the elves at the Wagner workshop start cooking up your skis—complete with your choice of graphics (the vintage stripes are especially nice). Large windows invite passersby to look in on the magic, making Mountain Village kind of like the North Pole year-round.

Both resorts offer terrain that is the envy of ski destinations around the world. In the end, you can’t go wrong.

To visit Telluride Luxury Properties click here

VOGUE | The Hidden Gems of Telluride

Telluride might be known for its famous landowners—Oprah Winfrey and Ralph Lauren among them—but this majestic ski town tucked away in a box canyon in southwestern Colorado still maintains its Old West charm. Once a mining town, and where Butch Cassidy started his bank-robbing career back in the 1890s, modern-day Telluride remains the unfussy, more casual ski-town sibling of places like Aspen or Vail. Don’t let the lack of fur coats and big-name chefs fool you—Telluride has world-class dining and lodging to match the outstanding ski terrain at Telluride Ski Resort.

There are Telluride establishments that should definitely be on your list, like Madeline Hotel and Residences (a favorite for its ski-in/ski-out access and après scene), Allred’s gourmet restaurant at the top of the gondola, and the 104-year-old Sheridan Opera House, where some of the entertainment world’s biggest names have passed through over the years. But if you are looking for some of the more under-the-radar spots, either because they are hidden in the mountains or are newer establishments, here are a few local watering holes that shouldn’t be missed on your next trip to Telluride.

Where to eat and drink
Tacos del Gnar
Tacos del Gnar might be one of the newest dining spots in town, but news of their mouthwateringly delicious tacos has spread quickly in Telluride. The casual spot is perfect for grabbing a quick bite after a morning spent shredding the gnar. Here you’ll find some of the most unique tacos one could dream up, like the Avo taco with tempura-fried avocado slices on a flour tortilla topped with shredded cabbage and a zippy sauce. This place is so good, you seriously might want to plan a second stop here before you leave town.

New Sheridan Historic Bar
The historic New Sheridan Hotel and its accompanying dining spots—the Chop House and its Historic Bar—are iconic watering holes in Telluride. The restaurant is one of Telluride’s finest, and the Historic Bar—which dates from 1895, is a favorite of locals and visitors alike for its lively atmosphere, games (pool and foosball), and nightly drink specials. But what many visitors don’t know is that the bar also has a limited but very tasty menu of its own. Think elk chili, French fries with truffle oil and Parmesan, French dip sandwiches (arguably the best in town), and more.

Friends With Bennys Food Cart
If you are in need of a quick breakfast in town, head straight to Friends With Bennys (located at the gondola plaza on the Telluride side) for the eggs Benedict sandwiches (they do vegetarian Benedicts and have several options for meat lovers) or the loaded breakfast sandwich, a homemade English muffin topped with a fried egg, prosciutto, cheddar cheese, avocado, tomato, arugula, and red onion. Locals consider it to be the best in the area. Insider tip: You can call or text your order to 970-708-0054 (include your order and your cross streets), and they will either deliver to you or pick a meeting spot nearby.

The Grilled Cheese Cart
Even the most dedicated grilled cheese enthusiast will not be disappointed by the sandwiches at the Grilled Cheese Cart in the Mountain Village Core. It has traditional grilled cheeses, and if you are more of an experimental grilled-cheese eater, go for the grilled Brie and apricot sandwich.

Between the Covers Bookstore
You might think it’s just a cute bookstore, but nestled in the back is High Alpine Coffee Bar, which brews locally roasted coffee beans from Tomboy Coffee Roasters. Find a cozy corner and enjoy your coffee with a good book.

Alpino Vino
You certainly won’t just stumble upon this place. Alpino Vino, a five-course Italian restaurant in a European-style chalet at 11,966 feet, is only accessible at night via a gondola ride followed by a 20-minute snowcat ride up the mountain. During the day, you can get to it by taking the Gold Hill Express, Lift 14. Ski down “See Forever” and you’ll see it. Chef Nico Peccedi, who hails from the Italian Alps, will wow you with his braised-duck ravioli, cauliflower soup with amaretti crumbles and truffle oil, and his signature tiramisu (his grandma’s recipe). As for the wine, opt for the premium wine pairing (all Italian wines) expertly curated by wine director Andrew Shaffner. Note: Guests must be at least 21 years old to eat at the restaurant at night. Call ahead to reserve your spots.

There Bar
Head to this tiny local hangout on Pacific Avenue for après-ski drinks and Asian-inspired tapas. There are many inventive cocktails on the menu, but it’s the jam drinks that locals come here for. (Yes, jam!) Just pick a jam—Maine blueberry, red pepper jelly, or pumpkin—and then pick your spirit—vodka, gin, rum, tequila, or rye. The red-pepper jelly and tequila combo is a good bet. As for eats, share the extra crispy brussel sprouts (you’ll find it hard to put your fork down with these), potatoes bravas (both good options for vegans), and the ramen, available with pork tenderloin, prawn tempura, duck breast, King crab, or veggies, plus a soft egg.

Where to ski
Plunge Lift (Lift 9)
Plunge Lift is a local’s favorite that gives you access to some of the mountains’ best advanced terrain, like Log Pile and Bushwacker, along with sweeping views of town.

Where to stay
Tempter House
If you are looking for somewhere to stay that’s truly off the beaten path, look no farther than Tempter House. Situated at 12,200 feet up and adjacent to Gold Hill, which is famous for its expert ski terrain, Tempter House is one of the highest elevation homes in North America. The Anne Eckley–designed house has sweeping views of the mountain, ski-in/ski-out access, an attendant for turn-down service, steam showers, a hot tub, a credit for dinner for two at Allred’s or Alpino Vino (two of the mountain’s best fine dining options), and a private chef available (for an additional cost). The Winter Overnight for Two package is $7,500 per night. Note: People book Tempter House around six months in advance, so make sure to plan ahead on this one. It’s not likely you will get a last-minute reservation.

To visit Telluride Luxury Properties click here

Freeskier | Amplifying Telluride: The gem of Colorado is kicking it up a few notches

by Paddy O’Connell/ October 27, 2016

Last year, massive early-season storms thumped Telluride. Nearly all of the resort’s 156 trails—spread across 2,000-plus acres—were open before Christmas. As the snow accumulated so did the skier visits. Guests remarked on what locals have known for decades: Telluride is a skier’s paradise. On a scale of one to 10, most anyone will tell you the terrain is an 11. The town itself is home to more remarkable and noteworthy characters than you’d find in an episode of Game of Thrones—that is to say, a lot. The entire experience of skiing and being in Telluride is like free pizza at a Parliament concert: a funky good time that leaves you satisfied, smiling and ready for more, time and time again.

What’s new in 2016-17?

Telluride has joined the ranks of Jackson, Alta/ Snowbird, Mammoth, Aspen Snowmass and others on the Mountain Collective pass. As outlined in detail in this web post, for $419 (limited time), Mountain Collective pass holders receive two “free days” and 50 percent off additional tickets at each of the 14 destinations that fly the Mountain Collective flag. Essentially, skiers can storm chase and shred some of the planet’s finest terrain all winter long without turning the piggy bank into burnt bacon.

Telluride is also now more accessible than ever before. This winter, Allegiant Airlines is offering affordable flights twice a week into neighboring Montrose via Denver International Airport. Great Lakes Airlines (part of the United network) will fly direct into Telluride from Denver. And reasonably priced, direct flight options to Montrose are available daily from nine hubs (including Houston, New York City, Los Angeles and Chicago) across the U.S.

Telluride

Shredding among the massive peaks of Telluride. Photo: Brett Schreckengost

Oldies but goodies

Simply put, Telluride’s terrain is insane. “The mountain speaks for itself,” says Director of Mountain Operations, Scott Pittenger, “and we’re always in a state of improving the goods.” This off-season, the Mountain Ops crew has been hard at work with forest management, cleaning up dead-fall from wintertime wind events. Sawyers have moved in on every glade on the mountain, but their most notable efforts have been in the Little Rose and Gold Hill 1 drains. “It’s a previously untreated area with tons of potential,” explains Pittenger. “The work will allow fluid top-to-bottom tree skiing on a great aspect.”

The five backcountry gates that access Bear Creek and Alta Lakes will continue to allow skiers the chance to experience Telluride’s famous off-piste skiing. But don’t be a dummy. The San Juan Mountains are world renowned for sheer faces, tight couloirs and unstable snowpack. Know before you go beyond the resort’s rope line. Or, take advantage of Telluride’s heli-skiing operation, Telluride Helitrax, to get some guided, untracked, steep and deep blower pow.

The vibe

The town was designated a National Historical Landmark Site in 1961, which means no chain businesses and no phoniness. It lives up to its motto: “the most Colorado place on Earth.” That old-timey mining shack held up by 1970s-era skis wasn’t built last week by a conceptual artist. That “shack” is somebody’s home. And while it’s true that more of the über-rich have taken a liking to Telluride in recent years, everything that Rasta Stevie said in Greg Stump’s The Blizzard of Ahhhs stands true. Unique, cool and funky, Telluride is a skier’s mountain and a skier’s town. “The mountains are what brings everyone—the rich, the rastas and the ski bums,” says born and raised Telluride shred queen Galena Gleason. “But it’s the community and funkiness that keeps us here.”

Skiing in Telluride is not just a good idea; it’s a rite of passage. The hike-to lines in Black Iron Bowl, the pucker factor atop Palmyra Peak and the local favorite combo of Mak-M-Stairs-Plunge (accessed from Plunge Lift) all test your mettle and provide an unmatched skiing experience.

telluride_statsheet

Telluride by the numbers

13,320

Elevation (in feet) of Palmyra Peak, an extreme in-bounds hike-to zone.

46

Degrees of slope angle at the drop-in atop Palmyra. Seniors “mellows out” to a sustained 37 degrees until you hit Palmyra Basin. It’s all smiles and laid-back windshield wiper turns from there on out.

6

Number of Gold Hill chutes. Access some of the most extreme resort skiing in the world via a railroad-grade hike? Yes, please.

200

Square miles of guided heli-skiing terrain in the San Juan Mountains serviced by Telluride Helitrax.

313

Name of Brown Dog Pizza’s award-winning Detroit-style pie. It’s stupid delicious.

Amount of Huey Lewis and the News songs played on the jukebox at The Buck, the favorite watering hole among residents. Skiing folklore and open-mouth kisses exchanged nightly.

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VIDEO | Telluride Ski Resort Shares Inversion Over Telluride Valley

clouds

One of the coolest phenomena we see here in Telluride is due to the box canyon nature of the town. Inversion occurs because the valley socks in colder air as the sky above warms with the sun. As the sun begins to breach the peaks and shine in the valley, the inversion disappears as town warms. It’s quite a view especially after an overnight snow dropping four inches on the top of the ski mountain.

To visit Telluride Luxury Properties click here

Telluride Ski Resort: Closing Weekend Activities

telskicover

 

closingweekend

 

For more information, click here to visit Telluride Ski Resort

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