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Yahoo! Travel: The Perfect Thursday Night In Telluride

town-of-telluride

By Melissa Fleming

April 16, 2015

Ah, Thursday night — the only truly social night of the week. It’s the night when babysitters are booked, friends convene, and drinks are imbibed. There are no family obligations to fulfill, no amateurish weekend crowds to elbow through — and the possibilities are endless. The night starts after work and ends whenever you want. In any city. All over the world. This week, we’re presenting the perfect Thursday night in Telluride, Colorado.

“To hell you ride” was once the colorful sendoff to the melting pot of fortune seekers heading to the San Juan Mountains in search of gold in the 1870s — and possibly even the origin of the town’s name, Telluride. But today it feels more like a little valley of heaven. In this True Grit territory — the original was filmed nearby in Ridgeway, Colorado — Butch Cassidy robbed his first bank in 1889. Since the 1970s though, when this ghost town was reintroduced as a ski town, people have been drawn to Telluride for the powder on the mountain. At 8,750 feet above sea level, Telluride maintains its Old West charm and small-town vibe without all the crowds you find at other Colorado resorts. And it’s not just for skiing. In the summertime, Telluride boasts a Bluegrass FestivalJazz Festival, and Film Festival, not to mention fourteen “14-ers” (mountains over fourteen thousand feet high), just waiting to be climbed. Here’s how to have the perfect night out in Telluride.

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Learn all about the town’s rich history at the Telluride Historical Museum. (Photo: Telluride Historical Museum)

4 p.m.: First stop: the Telluride Historical Museum. Housed in Hall’s Hospital built in 1896, this intimate museum gives old and young visitors alike an overview of the rich and diverse history of the region from the days of the Nuchu/Ute Native American tribes to the miners and skiers. After catching up on your history, walk around town — the entire place was designated a National Historic Landmark in 1961—some 12 blocks long and eight blocks wide, where former houses of ill repute now play host to local residents along Colorado Avenue, Telluride’s main street.

To read more, click here

To visit Telluride Luxury Properties, click here

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